Call Our Free Helpline NOW 949-379-6250

Employment Law News

PURLOINED POTTY PRIVACY

Posted by Samuel A. Wong | Jul 24, 2014 | 0 Comments

 ON 

Bathroom 300x3001

This falls under the heading of “be glad you don't work here”:  In Chicago, Illinois, a company has started monitoring the time employees spend in the bathroom and disciplining employees it thinks use the restroom too much.

The company requires employees to swipe a card on a card reader when they enter and exit the bathroom, and keeps track of how much time each employee spends in the toilet.  If an employee spends more than 60 minutes in the bathroom in ten working days – or about 6 minutes per day – the employee can be given a disciplinary warning for “excessive use of the bathroom.”  On the other hand, an employee who does not use the restroom at all during a workday can earn a dollar on a gift card, for up to $20 per month.

In California, there would be several problems with a potty policy like this.  California goes a lot further than many states to protect employee privacy.  Keeping a list monitoring all line employees' bathroom time seems to be a fairly major invasion of the employees' privacy, and while there are no laws directly addressing this situation, there is a good chance the courts would agree the employer's policy goes much too far.

Even worse, the potty policy could require employees to give their employers private, medical information.  There are numerous medical and disability-related reasons an employee might not be able to comply with the 6-minute limit or might need more than one or two bathroom breaks in a day, from Crohn's Disease to medication-related incontinence issues, to nausea from pregnancy or even cancer-related chemotherapy.  Not only would the potty policy discriminate against these people, which would be unlawful, but it also might require them to explain their medical conditions simply to keep their jobs.  Normally, employers are very limited in what kinds of medical information they can ask, but a policy like the one the Chicago company has would basically require employees to volunteer the information.  A California company almost certainly would not be able to get away with such taboo toilet tracking.

About the Author

Samuel A. Wong

Samuel A. Wong is a renowned Orange County trial lawyer and a Co-Founder of Aegis Law Firm. Mr. Wong has spent his entire career litigating employment related matters, including wrongful termination, discrimination, harassment, wage, disability and medical leave cases. Mr. Wong is also an expert ...

Comments

There are no comments for this post. Be the first and Add your Comment below.

Leave a Comment

The Quickest and Easiest Way to Hold Your Employer Accountable

At the Aegis Law Firm, we know that you may be going through a difficult time, and we are here to help you recover from the wrongs that you suffered. An attorney at our Orange County or Los Angeles law firm can speak with you for a free initial consultation to help you with your employment issues. We also take most cases on a contingency fee basis, which means that you do not pay any fees unless you win or recover compensation.

949-379-6250

Menu