Jury Awards $1 Million in Sexual Harassment Case

Jury-awards-Millions-sexual-harassment

A Los Angeles jury awarded over $1 million in damages to a former Merle Norman Cosmetics employee for finding that the company retaliated against her after she reported its two top officers for sexual harassment.  allegedly making sexually offensive remarks to her and a co-worker.

The victim, Stephanie Kelley, said that she initially felt comfortable at the cosmetic firm but things changed when her supervisor, Jack Nethercutt, started making sexually offensive remarks to her and a co-worker. Nethercutt inappropriately commented to Kelley about the attire of Sarah Tillman, her co-worker, stating Tillman should do more to show off her breasts. Continue reading “Jury Awards $1 Million in Sexual Harassment Case”

Sharon Stone Sued for Firing Her Injured Housekeeper

sharon-stone-suedAngelica Castillo hurt her back while loading groceries for Sharon Stone. A few months later, Ms. Castillo was placed on modified work duty as a result of her back injury and instructed to take a short period of bed rest. Sharon Stone denied her request for medical leave and told her to report to work the next day.  When Ms. Castillo arrived for work, Stone insisted she lift heavy objects despite her doctor’s warning not to do so. When Castillo reminded Stone that her doctor had placed her on modified work duty, Stone fired her.

Ms. Castillo’s wrongful termination claims include retaliation for requesting medical leave and modified cleaning duties to accommodate a work-related injury as recommended by her physician, failure to engage in the interactive process, and wrongful termination. By way of her lawsuit, Ms. Castillo is seeking general and special damages with interest, incidental and coincidental damages, punitive and exemplary damages, and costs and interest, including attorneys’ and expert witness fees, as well as injunctive relief and a declaration that Stone engaged in unlawful employment discrimination.

The case is Angelica Castillo v. Sharon Stone, Los Angeles Superior Court Case Number BC502597.

Employers Cannot Disclose Employee’s Private Information

Melissa Ignat asked the court to rule that her right to privacy was violated when her employer, Yum! Brands, Inc. (parent company of Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, KFC and others) told her coworkers that she suffered from bipolar disorder. The California Court of Appeals, Fourth District, Division Three ruled in her favor and held that an individual’s right to privacy can be violated by oral communications.

Appellant Melissa Ignat asked the appeals court to review the lower court’s grant of summary judgment. In November 2011, the lower court had found that she could not pursue a privacy action on the grounds that the right of privacy can only be violated by written disclosure, not by word of mouth. Continue reading “Employers Cannot Disclose Employee’s Private Information”