Category: Sexual Harassment

Sexual Harassment Lawyer

Seeking Legal Help for Sexual Harassment

You’ve done your research, you’ve become familiar with your company sexual harassment policy, and you’ve come to the conclusion that you are being sexually harassed. Now what? What steps can you take to make sure the sexual harassment stops, and what are your options if it doesn’t stop? These are very important questions and how one finds the answers determines whether there will be a positive outcome.

Taking the steps to stop sexual harassment begins in the workplace, and may or may not end with legal action. The steps taken and decisions made at every point in the process can make seeking help easier if those steps and decisions are the right ones. If legal help is eventually needed and sought, there are some things that need to be done early. Once sexual harassment is suspected or identified, the victim needs to immediately report the activity to Human Resources. It is also important to speak with a trusted friend or advisor and detail the activity. One important action that can be taken is to keep any and all emails and or recorded messages which will be of great help during a future case. Experts continually stress that there is nothing more important in a sexual harassment action than thorough documentation of the activity and actions taken to counter it.

Seeking legal help for sexual harassment can be an intimidating process. The first step is to investigate the many law firms that practice employment law. Luckily in our modern world, this research can begin online, where information is readily available about potential representation. You should look into reviews from clients, the type of law the firm practices, the number of attorneys who practice employment law in the firm, and how many years of experience they have in employment law. During this consultation, it will be important to have an open and honest conversation with the attorney about the sexual harassment claims and actions taken. It will also be important to present the evidence gathered over time in order to make the best possible case and lead to the best possible outcome.

Contact Aegis Law firm directly at (949) 379-6250 or learn more about our sexual harassment services https://www.aegislawfirm.com/ca-employment-law-practice-areas/orange-county-los-angeles-sexual-harassment-attorney/

Sexual Harassment Attorney

The Signs of Sexual Harassment Are Not Always Obvious

Sexual Harassment: It’s possibly the most serious issue in the workplace. When sexual harassment occurs it disrupts the workplace, is costly in terms of morale/productivity, and leaves emotional (or sometimes physical) scars that can ruin careers. For employees, it is extremely important to recognize when sexual harassment is happening, and to know what can be done about it.

Although it may seem counter intuitive, it is not always obvious that sexual harassment is occurring. Most employees can recognize obvious sexual harassment. An employee that is being touched inappropriately or groped has a strong argument for being sexually harassed. The same goes when an employee’s co-worker consistently uses sexually suggestive language, whistles or makes other lewd noises, gives inappropriate gifts, tells jokes of a sexual nature or attempts to show that employee pornographic material. Often, the individual engaging in such behavior will laugh it off as a joke, or suggest that everyone is just part of the same group of friends and no one should take such action or language seriously. The fact is that sexual conduct, language, or insinuations are never appropriate in a workplace and most companies have written policies making that clear.

Sexual harassment does not stop at explicit words and actions, though. Often, employees are in an atmosphere of sexual harassment and don’t recognize it. Sexual harassment can be against both women and men, and some policies and even court decisions are starting to use the term “gender harassment” to cover inappropriate language or actions based on sexual orientation. Sexual harassment based on one employee’s sexual attraction to another is what most people think of, but often one employee may not like another because they are female or male, or because they are gay, lesbian or transgender. In those instances, sexual harassment may be harder to recognize.

In those cases, sexual harassment could take the form of demeaning language or a situation where an employee finds themselves constantly berated. They might be excluded from groups or major company initiatives and/or given fewer assignments. In companies where there are multiple offices and locations, an employee may suddenly be relocated, often to an office or territory that is less desirable. Instead of being excluded from good assignments, an employee may be given a very difficult, often impossible assignment. In these cases, sexual harassment is subtle and based on a dislike due to gender, and often designed to get an employee to quit.

What can an employee do if they feel sexually harassed? Experts advise not to quit, but rather fight back. This is not easy, and requires research and perseverance. Begin by finding, reading, and understanding the company policy against sexual harassment. Report any uncomfortable instances immediately in writing. In many cases, it is a subordinate engaging in behavior that can be construed as sexual harassment, so if a company has an HR department, make the complaint to them and not to a direct supervisor.  Reporting will often initiate an investigation, and anyone who feels sexually harassed should understand that a company must be an impartial agent, and investigate all accusations, interview all parties and listen to all sides. This is where perseverance comes into play. Continue to report instances and create a paper trail that shows a pattern. Ideally, the situation is resolved and the work environment improves. But in many cases, things don’t turn out that way. Anyone who suspects they are being sexually harassed can and should seek legal advice to protect themselves and their career.

If you are looking for a sexual harassment lawyer to protect your rights contact us for a free case evaluation at (949) 379-6250.

Sexual Harassment Attorney

To Call or Not to Call – Why You Need a Sexual Harassment Attorney

Are you afraid to talk to a lawyer?
Do you think you might need a sexual harassment attorney?

Our country is in the midst of turbulent change, particularly regarding social matters. Issues such as racial and gender equality lead the forefront, calling upon those in power (and well, all of us really) to take a stand against civil injustice.

One of the prominent ideals of gender equality (namely Feminism) is the notion that women do not have to silently accept unwanted attention – regardless of whether others perceive it as “positive” or “negative” attention. Be it from men cat calling as she walks down the street, or a boss who promises career advancement in exchange for a romantic relationship, the boundaries of what is acceptable/complimentary/”just locker room talk” are evolving.

Despite the positive changes which are slowly but surely taking place, women still face antiquated expectations and outlandish double standards. Men who have many sexual partners are “experienced” while a woman is a “slut”. We are constantly told to smile more (something you rarely heard said to a man), “give the guy a chance” even if we aren’t attracted to them, and that sexual assault can be expected if we don’t choose our outfits carefully enough.

For a woman experiencing sexual harassment in the workplace, the stakes are raised tenfold. It isn’t just about your physical safety anymore, it’s also about financial security. You are placed in the difficult position of weighing the options – make a complaint and risk retaliation such as termination, or put up with the heinous behavior that you know you do not deserve. This behavior, of course, may rear its ugly head in a variety of different forms. Maybe the guy at the desk next to you constantly makes sexual jokes, though he knows they make you feel uncomfortable. Or perhaps your boss texts you too late at night, talking about how he “wishes you were there with him” (ew, I’m tired and just want to get to sleep). Then there are the more obvious, more worrisome, and unfortunately more frequent examples – the one who tries to get you alone, the one that stands too close to you or follows you whenever you get up to go to the bathroom, or most awful of all, the one that for some reason thinks it’s okay to touch you without your consent.

The implications can be terrifying when you see stories like these in the news everyday (or even due to the news…I’m looking at you, Fox News). Who knows what this person is capable of? On the other hand, if you complain and lose your job, how will you pay rent? Put gas in the car? Feed your family? Many women determine that the financial aspect takes precedence, usually because they feel alone and don’t know what their options are.

But What To Do?

This is the point where an experienced sexual harassment attorney needs to step in on your behalf. Your livelihood and peace of mind are not something to hesitate protecting, and that is what a sexual harassment attorney can help you do. Whether you are still employed or have been terminated, contacting an attorney is the best course of action. Naturally, the thought of reaching out to a sexual harassment attorney can be a stressful experience as well, especially if it’s the first time you’ve had to do so. But rest assured that it is the best way to protect yourself, your job, or possibly others who might be facing the same behavior from the harasser. At many firms (such as our own), the initial contact is completely confidential and without obligation. After gathering the basic information, an attorney will evaluate your situation and invite you in for a free consultation where your options will be discussed. It’s hassle free, and at the very least will give you an idea of where you stand.

Never be afraid to act in your own best interest. You are worth it!

For more information on how to obtain a sexual harassment attorney, see our page on the topic.

Sexual Harassment

Sexual Harassment in Corporate America – Not Just TV Drama

The 1960s probably come to mind when you think of men making aggressive (perhaps appalling) advances towards female co-workers. But the reality is, that “Mad Men” stereotype is not too far from the corporate world today. Even the 2016 election cycle seemed to bring some of this issue to light – i.e. grab them by the what? The Roger Ailes controversy was one of the most widely publicized and closely followed news stories of the year. Over two dozen women came forward to speak out against Ailes’ inappropriate behavior, leading the big wig to resign from Fox News after a 20 year career. The world was shocked when women spoke of sexual harassment and assault from beloved comedian Bill Cosby.

But for many women, they don’t have to watch the news to see harassment culture in action. A report released in June 2016 by the EEOC Select Task Force on the Study of Sexual Harassment in the Workplace revealed some alarming findings. Key findings included:

  • Workplace harassment remains a persistent problem
  • Workplace harassment often goes unreported (3 out of 4 victims never report the harassment)
  • There is a compelling business case for stopping and preventing harassment
  • It starts at the top
  • It’s on us (everyone)

The EEOC also notes that 45% of all complaints filed are based on sex. This is far more than any other type of harassment reported. They have also noted that 83% of all sexual harassment charges were filed by women.

Joann Lublin details the trials and tribulations of female executives in her book, Earning It: Hard Won Lessons from Trailblazing Women at the Top of the Business World. She is also the management-news editor at the Wall Street Journal. Lublin interviewed several successful women for the book and shares their personal stories of sexual harassment and degradation. Many of the anecdotes take place in the 1980s and 1990s, but not all. The broad span of years in which the incidents take place is rather disheartening. Unfortunately, it’s evident from many sources that sexual harassment still prevails today as well.

Most recently, a lawsuit was filed against insurance company AIG by their former employee Marlee Valenti. The plaintiff began working for AIG in 2009, and was promoted within a year to Senior Underwriter. She won multiple awards for her performance. The issues began in 2012 when she was transferred to the Public Management Liability Commercial Lines Division. The division was well known within the company as the “Boy’s Club”, as only an estimated 10% of its employees were female. Valenti states that in the division, she and other female employees endured incredulous acts of sexual harassment, including male executives hiding under women’s desks in order to look up their skirts. Valenti also stated that she had been groped and licked by male co-workers, among other things. Though the behavior was grotesque, the plaintiff didn’t feel there was anyone she could make a complaint to. Her direct supervisor Michael Donnelly was, in her words, “a willing participant” in the problematic behavior. Eventually, Valenti states that Donnelly began showing “clear disdain” towards her. This escalated in September of 2013 when she received a formal written performance warning. Along with the write-up, Valenti’s biggest account was taken away from her and she claims that she was denied opportunities, as all of her supervisors began ignoring her. In December 2013, the problems came to a head when Valenti discovered her co-workers had been “speaking negatively” about her to others in the industry. She had enough. This prompted Valenti to submit a 150 page rebuttal to management, complete with “evidence” of the harassment she had endured. The following month, Valenti was fired. The company allegedly completed “a perfunctory investigation” but found no wrongdoing.

It is only a small percentage of stories such as these that gain notoriety. The only way that workplace harassment will be eradicated is if each of us take action. That can be in the form of making complaints on your own behalf, or standing up for co-workers. When necessary, it can also take the form of a lawsuit. If you feel that you have been sexually harassed in the workplace, call our office for a free consultation. Together, we can help end this epidemic, one case at a time.

 

Sources:

http://nypost.com/2017/01/24/ex-aig-worker-sues-over-never-ending-stream-of-harassment/

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/aig-worker-sues-sexual-harassment-article-1.2953841

http://dealbreaker.com/2017/01/aig-sexual-harassment-lawsuit/

https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/10/when-women-have-power-they-can-do-something-about-sexual-harassment/505316/

https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/task_force/harassment/report.cfm#_Toc453686298

 

Sexual Harassment Attorney

Sexual Harassment Claims Land Shaun White in Hot Water!

Olympian, musician, and entrepreneur Shaun White has found himself in hot water. Former bandmate Lena Zawaideh has filed a lawsuit against him, alleging sexual harassment as well as wage claims. She states he did not pay her for some of her work. The legal matter was initiated in May 2016, but was not filed in court until recently.

Zawaideh was fired from the band Bad Things (which she helped form with White in 2008) after the end of their 2014 tour. She claims that throughout her duration working with the band, she was subjected to sexual harassment by White, being forced to endure various explicit pornographic images, listen to White’s vulgar language, and have to wear provocative outfits. Zawaideh states she would receive text messages from White including images of “engorged and erect penises”, as well as being forced to watch “disturbing” pornographic videos, some of which sexualized human fecal matter. Another showed a couple killing a bear, then having intercourse on top of it. The court complaint also details scenarios ranging from White sticking his behind in Zawaideh’s face, to him grabbing her behind or trying to kiss her.

Screen captures of text messages between the two exhibit a very different side of the all-American “Flying Tomato”. Some conversations reveal White angrily admonishing Zawaideh for wearing a fleece sweater to a band photo shoot, (not provocative enough for his taste, presumably) saying he was “really disappointed” and if she were to do it again, she would be asked to go home. Another exchange shows White asking (or rather, telling) Zawaideh to cut her hair the following day “at shoulder length or above”, and that it’s “really important to [him]”. She then responds by declining to comply with this request, explaining that she is “very confident and happy with her long hair”, which elicits angry responses from White. Allegedly, the following day White went out of his way to avoid and ignore Zawaideh. This incident led to her unwilling separation from the group. Zawaideh did not hear from White or other management initially, but much later received word from the new band manager that the band had “decided to part ways with her”. Other band members called Zawaideh afterwards to let her know that they weren’t present at the time of the call as the manager claimed, nor did they have any part in her termination.

The accusations don’t stop at sexual harassment – Zawaideh is also seeking compensation for wages that she claims White stopped paying her. She alleges that she is owed about $42,000, as White stopped paying band members their contracted amount in January 2014 to “cut costs”. However, other band members’ payments were temporarily reinstated. Zawaideh’s payments were not, because as White told the other band members he believed she “did not need the money”. Additionally, Zawaideh is pursuing claims that she was misclassified as an independent contractor, and therefore is owed additional overtime pay.

In response to the allegations, White has issued a statement through his attorney, saying “Many years ago, I exchanged texts with a friend who is now using them to craft a bogus lawsuit….There is absolutely no coincidence to the timing of her claims, and we will defend them vigorously in court.” What he is referring to regarding the “timing of her claims” remains to be explained.

Zawaideh issued her own statement on the matter, saying, “I am pursuing this case because women should not have to tolerate harassment at work. Shaun White should not be allowed to do whatever he wants just because he is famous. Although I am embarrassed to have been treated this way, I cannot sit by and watch him do this to other women”.

Sexual harassment cases are seemingly on the rise in the entertainment industry, from the alleged victims of Bill Cosby coming forward to the multiple Fox News anchors alleging sexual harassment. Perhaps the occurrences of sexual harassment are not rising, but more people are willing to come forward about their experiences and fight for their rights.

 

Sources: https://www.scribd.com/document/321397378/Shaun-White-Legal-Complaint

http://www.tmz.com/2016/08/16/shaun-white-sued-graphic-sexual-harassment-allegations-penis-pics-fecal-matter-hair-demands/

http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/05/shaun-white-is-being-sued-for-sexual-harassment.html